Pityriasis rosea

Pityriasis rosea

Pityriasis rosea is a viral rash which lasts about 6–12 weeks. It is characterised by a herald patch followed by similar, smaller oval red patches that are located mainly on the chest and back.
Many people with pityriasis rosea have no other symptoms, but the rash sometimes follows a few days after a upper respiratory viral infection (cough, cold, sore throat or similar).
The herald patch is a single plaque that appears 1–20 days before the generalised rash of pityriasis rosea. It is an oval pink or red plaque 2–5 cm in diameter, with a scale trailing just inside the edge of the lesion like a collaret.
A few plaques may also appear on the thighs, upper arms and neck but are uncommon on the face or scalp. These secondary lesions of pityriasis rosea tend to be smaller than the herald patch. They are also oval in shape with a dry surface. Like the herald patch, they may have an inner collaret of scaling. Some plaques may be annular (ring-shaped).